Frequently asked questions

How do I get started?

Congratulations! You’re taking the first step in becoming smoke free.

In order to join our service you can simply;

  • Click here to be taken  straight to our self-referral form
  • Call 0151 426 7462 to speak directly to one of our friendly advisors (*normal network rates apply) 
  • Text SUPPORT to 61825* and an adviser will contact you
What to expect?

We will offer you a high standard of service with a trained Stop smoking Advisor via our telephone service.

You will receive friendly, professional support and guidance through your quit attempt.

We expect to see clients for their full quota which could be anything between 12 and 16 weeks, which gives you the best chances of quitting successfully.

Your advisor will discuss Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) and other medications to help you with your quit attempt.

We expect clients to be smokefree for anything between 12 and 16 weeks depending on whether they are using monotherapy or combination therapy to quit.

You will receive a code via text or over the telephone to take to your chosen pharmacy to collect your NRT.

Continuing to smoke whilst using Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) supported by the Knowsley Stop Smoking Service during a quit attempt may result in further NRT not being issued.

Remember if you relapse don’t give up giving up! Continue with our support and try again.    

Will I gain weight?

When you quit smoking, your appetite and sense of taste can improve and you may be tempted to snack more often.

Remember that any weight gain need only be temporary and once you've stopped smoking you'll have more energy and you'll find it easier to be active. Make sure you have plenty of healthy snacks such as fruit or nuts in the house and hide the crisps!

What withdrawal and recovery symptoms can I expect?

From the moment you stop smoking, your body starts its recovery process. During this time you may find that you experience some nicotine withdrawal and recovery symptoms. You may notice that you still have the urge to smoke or feel a little restless, irritable, frustrated or tired. Some people also find that they have difficulty sleeping or concentrating. These symptoms will pass and there are plenty of things you can do to manage them in the meantime.

Try and stay focused on the benefits of stopping smoking, such as the amount of money you will save, the absence of cigarette smells on your clothing and the improvements to your health. Focusing on the positives will help you to stay stopped while the withdrawal and recovery symptoms pass. Why not join the Smokefree Facebook page  for hints, tips and messages of support from other people who are quitting? Make sure you share your own tips to

What if I start smoking again?

Don't worry if you lapse. You haven't failed. Just stick with it and get yourself back on track.

If you do have a cigarette, stop again immediately. Throw away the rest of the packet and go for a walk, drink some water and take a deep breath. Ask yourself if you really want to be a smoker again. You CAN do it!

What does smoking do to my body?

Smoking causes many serious and fatal diseases and conditions including lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), heart disease, bronchitis and emphysema. It also causes many other cancers, respiratory diseases and strokes, and can affect fertility.

Cigarettes contain over 4,000 toxic chemicals and around 50 of these cause cancer.

Carbon monoxide is a poisonous gas in cigarette smoke. It is also found in car exhaust fumes and produced by faulty gas appliances. It takes the place of oxygen in the blood, causing your lungs to work less efficiently. This stops cells all around your body from getting the oxygen they need.

Tar is the sticky brown substance that stains your fingers and teeth. Tar causes cancer and damages your lungs. It stays inside your lungs, making tubes narrower and reducing your protection against infection